Teenage dating violence hotline

“This helpline and website were designed exclusively for teens so they can speak to a peer or an adult advocate anonymously and confidentially.” Teens and parents anywhere in the country can call toll free, 866-331-9474 or log on to the interactive Web site, loveisrespect.org, and receive immediate, confidential assistance.

In addition to a toll-free phone line, will be the first interactive dating abuse website, staffed by trained advocates, where teens can write and immediately get assistance in a one-on-one private chat room. initiated and funded with a multi-year, million dollar grant as part of the Company’s commitment to helping end teen dating abuse in this country.

The research has mainly focused on Caucasian youth, and there are yet no studies which focus specifically on IPV in adolescent same-sex romantic relationships.

Intimate partner violence (IPV) in adolescents is an important realm of study as, in addition to the usual negative effects of abuse, this violence occurs at a critical period in the social and mental development of a person.

The helpline and website will be operated by the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

“My boyfriend terrorized me in a number of ways, but one of the most effective was through email.

They are also more likely to take IPV more seriously.

announced Thursday the launch of the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline (NTDAH), a 24-hour national web-based and telephone helpline created to help teens (ages 13-18) experiencing dating abuse during a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington DC.

This points to a strong influence of experience, or nature, on violent tendencies in adolescent relationships.

Multiple other studies corroborate these findings, citing childhood bullying, assault, and maltreatment as significant indicators for future violence in adolescent dating.

Girls are more likely to report committing less serious forms of IPV, including as a means of self-defense, whereas boys are more likely to report committing more severe acts of IPV, including threats, physical violence and controlling a partner.

Other research indicates that boys who have been abused in childhood by a family member are more prone to IPV perpetration, while girls who have been abused in childhood by a family member are prone to lack empathy and self-efficacy; but the risks for the likelihood of IPV perpetration and victimization among adolescents vary and are not well understood.

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